Sol Gabetta
drives BMW

Next Concert:

Sun 17.12.2017

Press

“Gabetta, the glamorous central attraction, made a dazzling showpiece of Haydn’s C major Concerto, complete, thank you, with the composer’s own cadenzas. An Argentine of French and Russian descent, she commands the sort of technique that unravels even the fiercest knot with apparently nonchalant savoir-faire. Still, she never sacrifices sumptuous tone or histrionic persuasion in the process. Official blurbs describe her as “charismatic”; for once, the hyperbole does not seem hyperbolic.”

Article:

“When the Mostly Mozart Festival opened at Avery Fisher Hall on July 28, a pair of old friends held court. Louis Langrée manned the podium — essentially hispodium — and Emanuel Ax served as luxurious keyboard soloist. On Tuesday, new friends took over, with Cornelius Meister making his heralded New York debut as guest conductor, and the splendid cellist Sol Gabetta basking in this spotlight for the first time. In all, it turned out to be an auspicious meeting of elite musical minds.
To call the concert a Mostly Mozart event does suggest something of a technical stretch. Mozart’s involvement actually entailed just the four minutes it takes to rush through the Nozze di Figaro overture, and Meister indeed might be accused of speeding. The 35-year-old native of Hanover sped, however, with a telling, uncompromising combination of energy and elegance. Under the circumstances, all was easily forgiven.

In his climactic endeavour, Beethoven’s Fourth Symphony, Meister continued to favour brisk tempos. Yet he never — well, hardly ever — did so at the expense of subtle dynamic nuance or expressive logic. The man can appear to be a bit fussy on occasion, but he fusses with probing intelligence, also a more than reasonable facsimile of sympathetic compulsion.
Gabetta, the glamorous central attraction, made a dazzling showpiece of Haydn’s C major Concerto, complete, thank you, with the composer’s own cadenzas. An Argentine of French and Russian descent, she commands the sort of technique that unravels even the fiercest knot with apparently nonchalant savoir-faire. Still, she never sacrifices sumptuous tone or histrionic persuasion in the process. Official blurbs describe her as “charismatic”; for once, the hyperbole does not seem hyperbolic.
Incidental intelligence: Meister proved himself a master of conducting not just the players but the audience too. He managed to sustain ongoing tension between movements, even in the symphony. Mirabile dictu, the normally clap-happy summertime crowd remained silently, appreciatively attentive until the final cadence. For that alone, he earned his ultimate bravos.”

- Financial Times, Martin Bernheimer, 07.08.2015